Thailand – Australia – United Kingdom

Big Blue Tech: West Coast Wrecks


Expeditions are about logistics, equipment, gas, support and diving. Finding the best wrecks and then taking you to them.

Recently described by Bruce Konefe as being “the new technical frontier“, Thailand has numerous world class sites for divers of all standards, making it an underwater adventure paradise. Some wrecks still remain unidentified and all sit just as they sank. Huge freighters, POW ships, drill ships, tankers, munitions carriers and even a US WWII submarine can be counted amongst the historical wrecks littering Thailand, The Andaman and South China Sea’s. All the wrecks listed have been located over the last five years and are truly untouched.

The museum provides a rich glimpse of the archeological riches of Thai waters, but it is probably the Kingdom’s natural treasures that are proving a greater test of diving skills. Thailand has a growing reputation among cave divers due largely to the limestone caves found all along its western coast in the Andaman Sea and mainland thailand.


Sun Shine 1

“Large Cargo Wreck

The cargo ship is 130m long and 15-20m wide, lying in the sand on its starboard side at a depth of 93m. The actual origin unfortunately is still unknown, however, from pieces recovered, it’s presume to have originated in Europe, possibly even in Germany. Sight is very good, protected by currents, water temperatures lie around 20°C, allowing a dive to be an extraordinary experience.

Even though the position of the wreck is rather deep , the wreck promises a demanding dive requiring sophisticated levels of experience.

Day trips and private charter available.

Discovered By: Deep Blue Divers, 2006

Diver Level: Hypoxic Trimix or CCR

Availability: October – May

Frequency: Visited once a month or more.


HMS Vestal

“The last British Royal Naval vessel sunk during WWII”

The Vestal was a British Minesweeper of Algerine Class. Actually the very last Royal Naval vessel sunk during WWII. The identification is now 100% confirmed as the bell has been located and positively identifies the vessel.

Algerine Class ship displaced 990 tons for a length of 65m. The motors where steam engines that could give a maximum speed of 16 knots. The armament was made of one 4 inch canon, 4 20mm canons and a Hedgehog mortar. The crew was made of 8 officers and a crew of 99.

The Vestal was hit by a Japanese Kamikaze plane and finally scuttled due to extensive damage on the 24th of July 1945. The ship now lies in 72m of water flat on its keel on a sandy seabed. The dive is a spectacular one. The amount of fish surrounding the wreck is fantastic.

Day trips and private charter available.

Discovered By: Deep Blue Divers, 2006

Diver Level: Normoxic Trimix or CCR

Availability: October – May

Frequency: Visited once a month or more.


The SS Petaling

“Small Cargo Ship”


This seems to be a small cargo ship of an overall length of about 40m. Recently a team found a plate of the shipyard and we can now presume that it’s the wreck of the Petaling.

The story says that it was sunk by a British submarine cruising the coasts of Phuket. The crew that survived the attack ended up drifting down to Kata Noi Beach, deported by strong currents.

The vessel now lies off Kata Beach in 58m of water, flat on its keel with a slight list to port.

The status of the ship is now pretty broken down. This wreck has a number of portholes lying around it that do not match the actual size of the boat. Like most of the wrecks, this one has been colonized by schools of fish, Morey eels now live in the numerous cavity’s, and it’s not rare to spot rays lying on the surrounding seabed.

Day trips and private charter available.

Discovered By: Fred Evans, 2002

Diver Level: Technical Diver

Availability: October – May

Frequency: Visited once a month or more.


HMS Squirrel

“British Minesweeper”

The HMS Vestal was thought to have been located back in 2002, recent identification of what was thought to be the sister ship turned out to be in-fact the HMS Vestal.

The wreck site we have been visiting for the last few year is in-fact confirmed as the HMS Squirrel as the bell of HMS Vestal was recovered and returned to the British Navy. This now clears up any confusion between the exact location of the two minesweepers.

Dives are challenging but rewarding for those willing to hit the wrecks. Advanced Trimix certifications are required for diving on the minesweepers.

Because it is known that lives were lost during the sinking, the site should be treated as a war grave and accordingly penetration of the wreck or the lifting of souvenirs is strictly forbidden.

Day trips and private charter available.

Discovered By: Deep Blue Divers, 2002

Diver Level: Advanced Trimix

Availability: October – May

Frequency: Visited once a month or more.

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